Climate Justice & Indigenous Allyship

Speakers will address the complexities of Canada’s climate future and our relationship with Indigenous people through a faith lens. Interactive panels will ensure that participants have an opportunity to engage with Indigenous teachings, ask questions, and join in conversations.
  • Climate Justice & Indigenous Allyship
  • 2016-06-11T10:00:00-04:00
  • 2016-06-11T18:00:00-04:00
  • Speakers will address the complexities of Canada’s climate future and our relationship with Indigenous people through a faith lens. Interactive panels will ensure that participants have an opportunity to engage with Indigenous teachings, ask questions, and join in conversations.
  • When Jun 11, 2016 from 10:00 AM to 06:00 PM (Canada/Eastern / UTC-400)
  • Where Senate and Board Chambers at Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Web Visit external website
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CLIMATE JUSTICE & INDIGENOUS ALLYSHIP

What Does It Mean? How Do We Get There?
Saturday June 11th 2016, 10:00am - 4:30pm
Senate and Board Chambers at Wilfrid Laurier University

Directions: https://legacy.wlu.ca/docsnpubs_detail.php?grp_id=160&doc_id=51006

Energy, environmental protection and Indigenous rights are inextricably linked. This forum offers support for faith communities to move toward allyship with Indigenous communities in the context of climate justice in Canada. Speakers will address the complexities of Canada’s climate future and our relationship with Indigenous people through a faith lens. Interactive panels will ensure that participants have an opportunity to engage with Indigenous teachings, ask questions, and join in conversations.

**Shared transportation from Toronto, Hamilton and other locations is being arranged. Please contact network@faithcommongood.org for further information**

Organized by Faith & the Common Good, Divest Waterloo, Sacred Water Circle, and the Green Awakening Network, with support from the Justice & Reconciliation Fund of the United Church of Canada

DETAILS
Featured Speakers:

Elder Myeengun Henry (KEYNOTE) is an Aboriginal Traditional Counselor from Chippewa of the Thames First Nation near London Ontario. Myeengun teaches at Mc Master University and Conestoga College. He will discuss the importance of reclaiming and using traditional knowledge to address complex environmental challenges, and the importance of honouring treaties and of consultation with First Nations on matters that impact their traditional territories.

Sheri Longboat is a member of the Six Nations of the Grand River, and for much of her career she has worked with First Nations communities implementing GIS technology for community-based land and resource management. It is her belief that solutions for current social-ecological challenges require multi-disciplinary approaches and collaboration among shared responsibilities.

Melissa Ireland was a driving force behind the creation of Laurier’s Indigenous Allyship An Overview – a toolkit for change. Serving with pride as the Aboriginal Student Support Coordinator for the Waterloo campus, Melissa has Anishinaabe (Ojibway) heritage from Curve Lake First Nation and is Marten Clan.

Dorothy Taylor is an Ojibwe Anisinaabe kwe and is recognized as a traditional teacher. Dorothy is the founder and current lead of the Sacred Water Circle, a collective of community volunteers with the objective of restoring humanity’s sacred relationship with water.

Byron Williston is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Wilfrid Laurier University and a member of the Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change at University of Waterloo. Byron is the author of The Anthropocene Project: Virtue in the Age of Climate Change (2015) and Environmental Ethics for Canadians (2011).

Lindsay Gray is an Aniishinaabe, Potawatomi, and Delaware from the Aamjiwnaang territory. A two-spirited land defender against Chemical Valley. Working grassroots with Aamjiwnaang and Sarnia Against Pipelines..

John Dillon is Ecological Economy Coordinator at KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives and author of Indigenous Wisdom: Living in Harmony with Mother Earth

Mardi Tindal, former Moderator of the United Church of Canada, has collaborated with faith leaders throughout Canada and around the world, to encourage action on the moral challenges of global warming, climate and ocean change

John Milloy is a former provincial cabinet minister and is Assistant Professor of Public Ethics, Waterloo Lutheran Seminary; Co-director, Centre for Public Ethics, Waterloo Lutheran Seminary;

Leah Gazan is a member of Wood Mountain Lakota Nation, located in Treaty 4 territory. She is currently teaching in the Faculty of Education at the University of Winnipeg. Leah has recently founded the #WeCare campaign, aimed at working with the broader Canadian public to participate in ensuring the end of violence against Indigenous women and girls.